NASA testing antibacterial 3D printing material

Leica Microsystems received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. FDA to market its Augmented Reality GLOW800 surgical fluorescence for vascular neurosurgery (pictured above). In combination with ICG (Indocyanine Green), GLOW800 allows surgeons to observe cerebral anatomy in natural color, augmented by real-time vascular flow in a single image, with full depth perception. This augmented reality solution provides the surgeon a complete view of anatomy and physiology to support crucial decisions and actions during vascular neurosurgery.

GLOW800 AR fluorescence is the first of many imaging modalities that will be based on the GLOW AR platform from Leica Microsystems. GLOW AR modalities can be fully integrated in the ARveo digital augmented reality microscope which launched earlier this year. Following the FDA 510(k) clearance of GLOW800, ARveo customers in the US can now experience the full advantages of augmented reality visualization in the operating room.

(Above) Boston Scientific’s Eluvia drug-eluting vascular stent system.


Boston Scientific
announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved its Premarket Approval (PMA) application to market the Eluvia drug-eluting vascular stent system, specifically developed for the treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD). The Eluvia stent uses a drug-polymer combination to offer sustained release of the drug paclitaxel for a one-year timeframe, designed to prevent tissue regrowth that might otherwise block the stented artery.

(Left) Cook Medical’s 5mm diameter Zilver PTX drug-eluting stent.

Cook Medical’s a new 5mm diameter version of Zilver PTX was approved by the U.S. FDA. It is the first 5mm drug-eluting stent in the U.S. with lengths available up to 140mm that is indicated to treat vessels as small as 4mm in diameter. The range of Zilver PTX stent diameters now available will address treatment of vessel sizes from 4mm to 7mm in diameter. The new diameter is better sized for smaller anatomy than previous sizes of the stent and provides an additional option to treat patients with lesions in their superficial femoral arteries (SFAs).

 

TransEnterix Inc., a medical device company digitizing the interface between surgeons and patients to improve minimally invasive surgery (MIS), has acquired substantially all of the assets of MST Medical Surgery Technologies Ltd., an Israel-based medical technology company, in a cash and stock transaction. MST is a leader in the field of surgical technology, having developed a software-based image analytics platform powered by advanced visualization, scene recognition, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and data analytics.

The addition of MST’s technology, IP portfolio, and R&D team supports and accelerates TransEnterix’s vision to leverage its Senhance Surgical System to deliver digital laparoscopy, increasing control in the surgical environment and reducing surgical variability.

(Above) OrthoXel’s Apex Femoral Nailing System

OrthoXel’s Apex Femoral Nailing System has been granted US FDA 510(k) clearance, following regulatory clearances and first clinical implantations of the Apex Tibial Nailing System earlier this year. The Apex Femoral Nailing System features a modern anatomic nail curvature in a universal nail that can be surgically implanted from antegrade or retrograde orientations with a dedicated instrumentation kit. The system offers a comprehensive suite of versatile multiple-trajectory locking options including OrthoXel micromotion for controlled axial movement with exceptional torsional stability to promote callus formation. Additional locking options include recon and rigid interlocking for unstable proximal femoral fractures.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has awarded 12 new clinical trial research grants totaling more than $18 million over the next four years to enhance the development of medical products for patients with rare diseases. These new grants were awarded to principal investigators from academia and industry across the country.

The FDA awarded the grants through the Orphan Products Clinical Trials Grants Program, funded by Congressional appropriations and encourages clinical development of drugs, biologics, medical devices, or medical foods for use in rare diseases. The grants are intended for clinical studies evaluating the safety and effectiveness of products that could either result in, or substantially contribute to, the FDA approval of products targeted to the treatment of rare diseases. Grant applications were reviewed and evaluated for scientific and technical merit by more than 100 rare disease experts, which included representatives from academia, the National Institutes of Health and the FDA.

The grant recipients, principal investigators and approximate funding amounts, listed alphabetically, are:
Alkeus Pharmaceuticals Inc. (Cambridge, Massachusetts), Leonide Saad, phase 2 study of ALK-001 for the treatment of Stargardt disease – $1.75 million over four years

Arizona State University-Tempe Campus (Tempe, Arizona), Keith Lindor, phase 2 study of oral vancomycin for the treatment of primary sclerosing cholangitis – $2 million over four years

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center (Los Angeles), Shlomo Melmed, phase 2 study of seliciclib for the treatment of Cushing disease – $2 million over four years

Columbia University of New York (New York), Yvonne Saenger, phase 1 study of talimogene laherparepvec for the treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer –  $750,000 over three years

Emory University (Atlanta), Eric Sorscher, phase 1/ 2 study of Ad/PNP fludarabine for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma – $1.5 million over three years

Fibrocell Technologies Inc. (Exton, Pennsylvania), John Maslowski, phase 1/2 study of gene-modified ex-vivo autologous fibroblasts for the treatment of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa – $1.5 million over four years

Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore), Amy Dezern, phase 1/2 study of CD8-reduced T cells for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia – $750,000 over three years

Oncolmmune Inc. (Rockville, Maryland) Yang Liu, phase 2b study of CD24Fc for the prevention of graft versus host disease – $2 million over four years

Patagonia Pharmaceuticals, LLC (Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey), Zachary Rome, phase 2 study of PAT-001 (isotretinoin) for the treatment of congenital ichthyosis – $1.5 million over three years

The General Hospital Corporation (Boston), Stephanie Seminara, phase 2 study of kisspeptin for the treatment of dopamine agonist intolerant hyperprolactinemia – $1.4 million over four years

University of Minnesota (Minneapolis), Kyriakie Sarafoglou, phase 2a study of subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusion pump for the treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia – $1.4 million over three years

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, North Carolina), Matthew Laughon, phase 2 study of sildenafil for the prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia – $2 million over four years

SOURCE: http://www.todaysmedicaldevelopments.com/Article/nasa-medical-materials-antimicrobial-10318

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